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The Right—and Wrong—Way to Pay for Your Dream Trip

I’m short on cash. Should I put my vacation on...

The Right—and Wrong—Way to Pay for Your Dream Trip «

The Right—and Wrong—Way to Pay for Your Dream Trip

I’m short on cash. Should I put my vacation on a credit card?
Nooooooooo!

Unless the trip is someone’s dying wish, charging travel expenses that you can’t immediately pay back is not the way to go. “You end up paying much more than the cost of the trip,” warns Mackey McNeill, a Kentucky-based CPA and author of The Intersection of Joy and Money. “When you factor in double-digit interest rates and the months—or years—it may take you to pay it off, you can end up spending 50 percent or even 100 percent more.”

READER TIPS!
Not surprisingly, readers on BudgetTravel.com offer some imaginative—and highly effective—ways to pay for the trips they crave.
“For all our vacation spending/mad money we save any $5 bills—they all go into our vacation savings pot. So if you go somewhere and pay with a $20 and get three $5’s back, they all come home to the pot! Last year we saved enough spending money for three trips!” Mary Lou Hood Brangers, Morristown, Tenn.

“I begin planning about six months ahead and pay for as many things as possible in advance, such as theater tickets and some hotels, so that the cost will be spread over as many billing cycles as possible.” Thirza Sloan, Covington, Tenn.

“I have a vacation savings account into which I put my credit card rewards checks, rebates, rolled change, and any found money as I get it. Because we get paid biweekly, there are a couple of months when we get three paychecks instead of two, so I also earmark one of those ‘extra’ checks for the vacation account.” Ingrid Windsor, Smithsburg, Md.

That goes for other kinds of borrowing as well. Don’t let an excuse like “We deserve it” prompt you into a home equity loan. Financial expert Grant Cardone, star of the television series Turnaround King, offers a simple rule of thumb: “If you’re too ashamed to ask Mom and Dad for travel money, don’t ask a bank or a credit card company.”

That said, Cardone notes that if you are able to pay off credit card charges before interest or fees kick in, it’s an efficient way to keep track of your expenses and can often nab you bonus points for future discounts or upgrades with a hotel chain, rental car agency, or airline. McNeill suggests that if you use a card, ask for an introductory, no-interest period beyond the usual 30 days and make sure you understand exactly what your deadline is.

READ ABOUT 5 CREDIT CARDS YOU SHOULD CONSIDER!
Does it make sense to set up a vacation savings account?
Yes, and the best way to make it work is to have money automatically deducted from your paycheck or checking account each month and tucked away in an account that you pretty much forget about until you need it. “Don’t worry about how much interest it earns,” says McNeill. “It won’t be much, but the point is that it’s more effective than stuffing bills in a cookie jar.”

The first thing to do is determine how much you can afford to stash away each month, and don’t be stingy. Try a little creative visualization—would the $4 you’d spend on a latte this afternoon and the $20 you blew on pizza last night be better spent, say, at next year’s Mardi Gras? Those kinds of sacrifices can quickly add up, often netting you an extra $100 a week in travel savings.

BT reader Vickey Allen upped the out-of-sight-out-of-mind factor by setting up her vacation savings account at a bank 30 miles from her home and opting out of e-banking. “I just withdrew enough to pay for a Mediterranean cruise on the new Carnival Breeze!” she says.

READ BUDGET TRAVEL’S CRUISE SAVINGS CHEAT SHEET!
How do I know what I can afford to pay for a vacation?
The old rule of thumb is that a once-a-year vacation should cost about one week’s salary, but there’s really no algorithm that’s right for everyone. It’s a personal decision that depends on your fixed expenses (housing, cars, student loans, insurance) and lifestyle choices.

“For some people, travel is important enough that they choose to live in a smaller house and keep a lot of their discretionary expenses down so they can see the world,” says McNeill.

But Cardone warns that the most common mistake in vacation budgeting is underestimating costs. As you research your trip, remember to include not just airfare and hotels but also meals, cabs, shuttles, dry cleaning, souvenirs, tips, and a cushion for those great—or awful—OMG moments. (Cardone suggests setting aside an extra 25 percent for the unexpected.) Then figure out when you want to go and set up a monthly savings schedule.

For retirees on a fixed income, budgeting for bucket-list vacations can seem daunting. McNeill suggests that you put them on the calendar as part of your long-term financial plan and be as specific as possible. She helps her retiree clients to identify which years will require extra money for dream trips and which trips will be more affordable, so a walk on the Great Wall of China can become just one of many predictable expenses instead of a calamitous hiccup.

CHECK OUT 11 BUCKET LIST VACATIONS YOU CAN ACTUALLY AFFORD!
Is there such a thing as vacation layaway?
You may associate the word layaway with refrigerators and sofas, but prepaid travel plans are on the rise. Similar to socking money away in a vacation savings account, the big difference here is that you make regular payments to a tour operator or financial services company prior to your trip. Think of it as adding another layer of forced discipline.

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